A rugged new flip phone

Taking a break from the ever-increasing number of smartphones and the passions they inspire, today’s article will throw a look at a flip phone, more exactly the Kyocera DuraCore. Unlike other offers, this one is rugged and was verified by the company behind it to see how it reacted to vibrations, dust and shocks. We read the results of these benchmarks and they were all very favorable. The absence of a camera and possibility of memory expansion didn’t really affect us, but if you want to be able to take photos and record movies, our blog offers reviews of phones that are able to do that with style.

Shock resistant

The Kyocera DuraCore has a name that says it all. But we’ll reinforce that by reporting that it performed above expectations when we spilled a bit of dust over it and when we subjected it to some shocks and vibrations. The rubber material it is made of greatly contributed to the very good scores it got and made us appreciate Kyocera phones a lot. Design has to suffer to allow for these results, so you won’t get a super stylish, elegant, very slim and thin device to show off to your friends. All you get is a phone that’s ideal when you’re working on a construction site and other such places. The front of the device services a speaker grille and under it is a 1″ external screen whose 96 x 64 pixels won’t make you miss a better resolution, because this one does its job surprisingly well. Looking at it we saw the strength of the battery, the hour, the messages and calls we missed and also the signal meter.Kyocera-DuraCore

2 inch QVGA TFT display

The internal parts and the ports of the DuraCore are protected by keys made of rubber (that you can press without getting headaches) and flaps. Directly on the right side is a headset jack measuring 2.5mm; on the left are a PTT key, a volume button and one port for microUSB charging. The speaker and call keys are located on the top of the phone. The rear protects the battery with a cover that has a sliding lock. You’ll dislike this, but the Kyocera DuraCore doesn’t feature a microSD card slot with which to expand the existing memory.

Inspecting the phone even more, we flipped it open and were welcomed by a second, 2″ QVGA TFT screen. The 240 x 320 resolution gave no major issues and the buttons underneath the display sported soft-key navigation and functions the likes of end/power, speaker and many more to use. They were all easy to press and opened the respective functions without putting up a fight.

Good sound quality

The tests for audio quality went well and the phone surprised us with a good volume, albeit hearing some background noise, and the speakerphone was decent, minus a bit of white noise whenever our friends said something. Voices would now and again interrupt, but it’s wasn’t excruciatingly horrible. People who talked with us didn’t have problems in their calls. Don’t forget to hold the DuraCore near your waist, because that’s where sound quality is at its best, and don’t sit in a room with a lot of background noise. Talk time was good: 8 hours in total. Battery life kept the product afloat for 4 days.

Conclusion

Cutting to the chase, the Kyocera DuraCore is a phone that will be of immense help if you work in an environment that needs a rugged device with good performance, battery and ease of use.

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